Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Technology brightens prognosis for HIV/AIDS patients: U.S. expert

In the heart of Texasa state associated with cowboys and Western-style machismo,HIV/AIDS was a disease almost no one talked about -- except for the homosexual malecommunity that then seemed to be the disease's target population -- at the beginning ofthe outbreak in the early 1980s.
That has changedprimarily due to the broadly different range of lifestyles of people withHIV/AIDSand especially because of medical technological advances that have switchedthe HIV/AIDS diagnosis from an automatic death sentence to simple changes in themedical regimen that produce much longer life spansa U.Sexpert told Xinhua in a recentinterview.
"When our agency started in 1982, you got the diseaseyou developed the disease and youdied," said Nike Bluedirector of programs for AIDS Foundation Houstonthe firstHIV/AIDS organization in Texas and the first to develop a pamphlet to spread awarenessabout the disease throughout the state.
HIV/AIDS was called "the gay virus," Blue said.
"While in the United Stateswe were mainly finding that it was gay men who had thediseasebut AIDS was never a disease of one sexual orientation," Blue said.
"We knew it was transmitted mainly through anal sex without the use of condomsButover the last 10 years we have noted that communities of this disease has shiftedIt's not adisease where sexual behavior defines your risk or increases likelihood of contracting thedisease."
The first people arrived at the foundation to take advantage of the AIDS FoundationHouston's housing for HIV/AIDS patients in the early 1980s were gayhomeless men.
"Our housing came about originally because people were getting kicked out of theirhomes," Blue said of the stigma associated with the disease. "They came to us as a lastplace before they diedNow our housing is not a place to come and diebut a place to comeand survive."
Individual men and womenheterosexual and homosexualnow come to the foundation'shousing primarily from communities of poverty.
"We try to stabilize their HIV through supporting them as they are going to the doctor'sofficetaking their medications," Blue said.
"Gay men are still acquiring this disease at high ratesbut communities are living withAIDS where they have a lack of access to health care and basic medical careplus a lack ofeducational achievement and lack of transportation in these communities."
Major advances in the care of patients with HIVthe immune system infection that wasonce a first step to developing full-blown AIDShas been busy in the past five yearsBluesaid.
"We now have patients with a virtually undetectable viral load -- a load so small thatchances of transmitting HIV to a partner is veryvery low," Blue said.
"We have medications that affect HIV transmission ratesWhile there are still pockets ofAIDS due to poverty -- the epidemic is still moving and growing bigger -- the person whogoes to doctor and takes their medication can live a long and prosperous life."
The drug Atripla is now frequently prescribed for people who are newly diagnosed withHIVBlue saidand greatly reduces the risk of the disease progressing to full-blown AIDS.
Another medicationTruvadacan be taken by HIV negative partners of people who areHIV positive and it serves as a preparation drug that reduces their risk of getting HIV.
"Those are just two huge biomedical advancements," Blue said. "Back in the '80s, peoplewith HIV/AIDS took 30-something pills a dayNow people can take a couple of pillscheckwith their doctor and worry a lot less."
Despite advancementsshe said that medical technology is still a long way from a cure forHIV/AIDS.
"A lot is being done toward finding a curebut the type of vaccine that will cure HIV orAIDS is still a long way off," Blue said.
"Right nowthe best thing people with HIV/AIDS can do is to take Travada and follow theprotocol that is given from their doctorsThat's the very big thing that we have."


    Post a Comment